Chelyabinsk, Fully-Crusted Whole Pea Meteorite

$10.00
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On February 15, 2013, a spectacular bolide streaked across the sky of Siberia and the town of Chelyabinsk. The bolide was so big and bright, that many people ran to their windows to look at it - a minute later a massive shockwave from the impact slammed the city, causing major damage. A factory wall collapsed and thousands of windows were broken by the pressure. Hundreds of people were injured by flying glass and debris. 

This was the most devastating meteorite impact in Russia since Tunguska nearly a century ago. Unlike Tunguska (which was likely an icy comet), the Chelyabinsk meteorite was made of dense stone, so many fragments and meteorites survived the impact and are scattered across a large strewnfield. Chelyabinsk has been classified as a highly-shocked LL5 chondrite.

The specimen being offered here is a fully crusted intact "pea stone" meteorite selected from the larger lot shown in the photo. Each stone is very tiny and complete with crust. Some have orientation features like rollover lips. These peas are early-recovery stones that were sourced from a local Russian dealer - they have no oxidation. The stones that are not black are the less-common "brown crust" types which looked that way immediately after the fall and the color is not the result of oxidation. Each pea weighs less than a gram and most weigh about 100mg, give or take.

Refer to the photo. The black centimeter cube is shown for scale and is not included. You are purchasing ONE (1) pea selected from the larger lot shown. You will get the largest stone remaining. Your purchase will include a labeled gemjar for safe storage. 

From the Meteoritical Bulletin entry on Chelyabinsk


Chelyabinsk 54°49’N, 61°07’E (approximate centroid)

Chelyabinskaya oblast’, Russia

Fell: 15 Feb 2013; 3:22 UT

Classification: Ordinary chondrite (LL5)

History: At 9:22 a.m. (local time) on February 15, 2013, a bright fireball was seen by numerous residents in parts of the Kurgan, Tyumen, Ekaterinburg and Chelyabinsk districts. Images of the fireball were captured by many video cameras, especially in Chelyabinsk. Residents of the Chelyabinsk district heard the sound of a large explosion. The impact wave destroyed many windows in Chelyabinsk and surrounding cities. Many people were wounded by glass fragments. A part of the roof and a wall of a zinc plant and a stadium in Chelyabinsk were also damaged. Numerous (thousands) stones fell as a shower around Pervomaiskoe, Deputatsky and Yemanzhelinka villages ~40 km S of Chelyabinsk. The meteorite pieces were recovered and collected out of snow by local people immediately after the explosion. The snow cover was about 0.7 m deep. The falling stones formed holes surrounded by firn snow. Largest stones reached the frozen soil. A stone may have broken the ice of Chebarkul Lake, located 70 km W of Chelyabinsk. Small meteorite fragments were found around the 8 m hole in the ice but divers did not find any stones on the lake bottom.